Tag Archives: Mathew Lynch

UH Sustainability Briefing

Many of the technical solutions exist for the sustainability challenges we face, however the social friction of our organizations often get in the way. Learn more about how the social architecture of sustainability can catalyze transformational change.

Matt Lynch from the UH Office of Sustainability will be giving a presentation on the President’s Green Initiative Awards (cash prizes for student-led sustainability projects) and the systemwide sustainabiltiy strategy.


When: Wednesday, November 4, 2015 @ 7:00pm

Where: Manoa Innovation Center (HICapacity), 2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite #132, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822.

Street parking is available, as well as a limited amount of green vistor stalls are available. Please do not park in the reserved stalls.


Matthew Lynch

Matthew Lynch is the System Sustainability Coordinator for the ten campuses of the University of Hawaii. He is also founder of of the Honolulu based nonprofit Asia-Pacific Center for Regenerative Design, and currently serves on the Board of Directors for Kahumana Organic Farm and Slow Food Oahu, and as the Measures Project Co-Chair for the Hawaii Green Growth Aloha+ State Sustainability Dashboard.

His work implements permaculture design principles in a broad range of community projects from Mongolia to Australia and throughout the Pacific, from building rural community resilience through farmer trainings, to sustainable economic development, to catalyzing institutional change through policy work and collaborative leadership.

Matt’s talent for energizing communities and individuals has re-humanized urban and institutional systems in the developing and developed worlds, and works towards restoring & regenerating the ecological systems upon which these social systems depend.

post by Ed Kim, HICapacity

ESW in UH System News

“Solar Cart project powers up renewable energy education”

View the story: http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2015/07/10/solar-cart-project-powers-up-renewable-energy-education/

“Projects like the Kapiʻolani CC Solar Cart are a vital part of the university’s larger strategy to improve sustainability and sustainability education because they offer us the ability to enhance students’ learning experience through solving real-world challenges that directly impact our campuses,” said UH System Sustainability Coordinator Matthew Lynch. “These small-scale pilot projects also allow us to test innovative technologies and ideas to develop viable solutions that can be deployed at larger scales.”


E HOʻOMAIKAʻI ANA ia ʻoukou!
CONGRATULATIONS YOU GUYS!

This is the step that everyone needs to be taking in the world.

If Every home had something like this, they would be able to survive without generators and other costly things that most of the Kanaka cannot afford in the first place.

I hope that you can make a copywrite or something and sell the plans because I have 38 in my household and have lived through 2 hurricanes struggling with my 7 children now with 18 grandchildren too.

We would surely be able to build one with the diverse talents in our ʻohana because everyone is a “jack of all trades” and a master of none.

I am the first one able to go to college at 50. My two daughter in laws have liberal arts degrees and other than that, we all just have work experience in the real world.

But this project that you folks have created would be just as important as our hulihuli machine, our poi grinder, our pakini, and our toolshed.

Because this would help our ʻohana connect with the modern amenities that we need when there is no other source available.

Hūlō Hūlo Hūlō!

Iesū pū, aloha.

Tūtū Māmā Uʻilani Kūhaulua


 

http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2015/07/10/solar-cart-project-powers-up-renewable-energy-education/

Thanks for the Spotlight from KCC’s OFIE

Check out our spotlight article from the Office of Institutional Effectiveness at KCC:

Spotlight on STEM “Building a Better World: National Engineering Organization launches Local Chapter”

By Micael Rodriguez and Jason Salseg (edited by Kendall Kido)

To many, learning to live in harmony with nature while enjoying modern innovation and technology sounds like either a pipe dream or a distant, futuristic reality.  There are some who believe this to be impossible altogether.  One new club on campus seeks to make this dream a reality.  Now.  Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW); a national organization of students, university faculty and working professionals; welcomes its newest chapter on the campus of Kapi’olani Community College.  Kapi’olani ESW joins over 50 other chapters in universities across North America.

The local Hawaii chapter, which plans to coordinate with other higher education institutions in the state, was spearheaded by student Jason Salseg with the help of Kapi’olani CC faculty members Dr. Harry Davis and Dr. Aaron Hanai.  Jason says the goal of Kapi’olani ESW is to, “engage future engineers who are still at the college and middle school and even elementary school level with hands on activities that benefit the community and have a focus on sustainability driven projects.  Starting their focus now will have a tremendous impact later in the field of engineering.”

The club had its first meeting in April and hit the ground running. Within three weeks, they designed and built their first project: a functional solar powered cart delivering a hearty 500 watts per hour.  Local companies, Solar Cool, All-Build Construction, Universal Manufactures & Re-Use Hawaii donated materials, and club members Yu Gong, Geena Wann, Will Kaeo, Bryson Racoma, Jackson Poscablo, Joe Valle, Michael Rodriguez and Jason Salseg designed and constructed the functional cart which debuted for the Earth Day event April 20th.  Club member Geena Wann said, “we are still small, we are still new, so we are by taking on these smaller projects we can work towards a bigger goal.  Hopefully in the future, we can get us to the point where we can be completely sustainable.”

Kapi’olani CC ESW is looking forward to the future.  They plan to tackle other renewable energy projects like biodiesel, hydroponics and hydrogen cell technologies.  With such lofty goals, it helps that members hail from so many different engineering majors.  Currently, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering are represented, however all disciplines are encouraged to participate and help create a sustainable present, and a sustainable future.

“You have these big topics of concern that can only be addressed by engineers.  When you see (young) students interested in taking on these incredibly large and complex issues, you know that these things can get solved.  These are the student engineers who are going to fix those problems.”

-Jason Salseg

Thank you OFIE: http://ofie.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/